How to pick healing providers who are right for Empaths

How to pick healing providers who are right for Empaths

 

Only go to doctors, psychotherapists and healers you trust. Without trust, healing cannot happen. Word of mouth can be good, although nothing beats following your own intuition. Empaths require providers who are associated with these words; authentic, caring, professional, and trustworthy.

Recently, I went to a new provider, who was recommended to me by a friend. Although I was impressed with his punctuality, during our visit he was distracted and rushed. I would have preferred waiting for a doctor who thoroughly went through my health concerns and history. When I described why I was not doing a certain test at this time because of another health issue, he remarked, “That doesn’t make any sense.” I had the clarity in that moment to assert myself and say, “Yes, it does make sense and here is why.” He did not apologize. Needless to say, I will not be returning for another appointment with him.

Here are some factors to consider when choosing a provider

Trust -Feel comfortable with your providers’ skills and expertise. You need to feel at ease opening up and discussing what matters to you most, even if you disagree. When you are ill, you are vulnerable, this is why trust is at the top of the list.

Good listening and communication abilities- You want someone who is an accurate reflector. They hear what you say, comprehend it and can rephrase it back to you. When you speak is your provider looking you in the eyes and present with you? Do you feel connected non-verbally and verbally?

They care- Really care- When you are with your provider do you feel valued? Is this person compassionate and empathic when you express your concerns? If you feel judged, it is time to search elsewhere.

They got skills– Your provider is professional. This person is competent, has the knowledge and expertise in the area of medicine they practice within.

This person does a thorough examination with you. This includes reviewing your health history and checking it for accuracy. They have paperwork about their practice and go over it with you and answer any questions you have.

This person is flexible and understands that mental and physical health is not a one size all fits system. They are able to think outside the box and see you as a complete picture of mind-body-spirit.

Have a consultation call or appointment first. Take the fifteen to thirty minutes of time to get to know who you will be working with. Ask about their training and experience with your issues, how they do their work, specialties they have and inquire about their own self-care/healing.

Congrats!

You have found the right match for you when you feel comfortable and at ease. Trust your instincts. Remember if you go to a provider and he or she does not feel right for you, switch! I know I will and have in the past.

Where you need to keep an open mind

Two factors you may need to be flexible with is the cost of your service and distance to travel. Do not choose a provider based on a cheaper price because you may not get the service you desire. Also, do not go with convenience. Sometimes you have to travel a little further to connect with the right fit.

For more info: If you need more help with managing your sensitivity in today’s world, contact Lisa Hutchison LMHC for a free 30 minute consult call. She is a licensed psychotherapist and writing coach for empaths and artists. Head on over to her website and get your free 10 page E-book, 8 Simple Things that Release Chaos from Your Life Now! at www.lisahutchison.net 

 

 

 

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What helpers like you need to know about burnout

What helpers like you need to know about burnout (3)

 

Helpers and first responders often believe that they can push through irritation and emotional pain. You soldier on despite multiple systems in your body screaming out for you to stop. Some of these warning signs are unending fatigue, sleep difficulties, appetite changes, concentration problems, anxiety, depression, increased illnesses and anger.

As an empathic helper, you are going to experience work or help related stress due to caring so much. When that stress is combined with a lack of self- care and a lack of support more serious stress reactions can occur such as burnout, compassion fatigue and vicarious traumatization.

Compassion fatigue and burnout arises from too much work, or as many people say burning the candle at both ends. Empathic helpers often absorb other’s pain and take it with them into their home life. Too much sympathy or working with empathy without proper boundaries drains helpers of energy and leads to burnout. In a study of 216 hospice care nurses from 22 hospices across the state of Florida it was found that, “Trauma, anxiety, life demands, and excessive empathy (leading to blurred professional boundaries) were key determinants of compassion fatigue risk in the multiple regression model that accounted for 91 % (P< .001) of the variance in compassion fatigue risk.” (Abendroth & Flannery 2006).

Vicarious traumatization can happen when you absorb the psychological material of your client who has experienced trauma. You feel the trauma in your own energetic system as PTSD symptoms such as intrusive thoughts, irritability and startle responses. This is why it is important to hold the energetic boundaries and seek supervision or your own counseling. If you are experiencing increased anxiety, startle responses or irritation, after your work with a client ask yourself; is this my trauma or yours?

What can a compassionate helper do?

  • You need to limit your use of empathy. Yes, there can be too much of a good thing.  Empathy is one tool a helper uses in combination with other techniques to ensure client growth. At times you may need to use more directive or instructional types of methods rather than an all-out holding of the space for another.
  •  Be aware and recognize that trauma and stress are running the show. When you notice a change in your mood and thoughts, review your day and think about who you were with and what was discussed.
  • Self- Care. All empathic helpers need a self-care regime that refills and recharges your energy. Relaxation and energy increasing activities will balance out the fatigue you are experiencing. Grounding through the use of mindfulness can keep your focus in the present moment.
  • Seek psychotherapy with an empathic therapist who can help you with burnout and trauma. Going to a therapist who knows trauma, work stress and energy work can make a world of difference for yourself and your clients.
  •  Get this workbook for yourself and your clients. I have found this to be a valuable resource that I use with my clients: The PTSD Workbook: Simple, Effective Techniques for Overcoming Traumatic Stress Symptoms Workbook Edition by Mary Beth Williams (Author), Soili Poijula (Author) Some of the chapters include: Before Doing the Work: Safety, Security and Intention and Helping Yourself When You Re-experience a Trauma. (As an amazon affiliate I receive a small portion of the sale when you buy after clicking the above link, without any addition cost to you. Thank you for choosing this method of purchasing.) 

References:

Abendroth, M., & Flannery, J. (2006). Predicting the risk of compassion fatigue: A study of hospice nurses. Journal of Hospice & Palliative Nursing, 8(6), 346-356.

Lisa Hutchison LMHC works for empathic healers who feel drained after their helping efforts, refill and recharge their energy with intuitive counseling and angel card readings. For more information visit her website at www.lisahutchison.net, while you are there take advantage of the free gift 8 Simple Things that Release Chaos from Your Life Now!